SenseAbility Webinar 4: SenseAbility and the National Curriculum

SenseAbility Webinar 4: SenseAbility and the National Curriculum


Welcome to the beyondblue Mapping The SenseAbility
Curriculum Against The Australian Curriculum webinar. It’s super charged by Principals
Australia with freshly-picked content that has been selected for your pleasure by the
impressive beyondblue team, and it’s gonna be plated up by Jessica Satori. Jessica is an experienced educator from the
Department of Education in Victoria and she’ll be with us shortly. She’s just getting ready
in the green room. We also have the incredible Rene Hahn joining us from beyondblue. She
doesn’t have the microphone, but she is indeed live and well. She will just pop a quick hello in the text
chat box to you and she may even include, she’s done that already, include her e-mail
address in case you might want to reach out in get in contact with her. Rene is going to be keeping an eye on the
text chat. Please make sure you ask her any questions along the way about resources that
you can access or any other assets that beyondblue have that might help you with your work. We’ve got Shannon McGeary with us
in the control tower. Shannon’s gonna be organising the traffic to make sure that this webinar
gets landed on time and safely and doesn’t disappear off anybody’s radars. Thank you
for that, Shannon McGeary. Let’s make sure that you’re comfortable. This webinar being
recorded and will be made available for you to share widely afterwards. It’s one of a
series of webinars connected to the incredible SenseAbility resource. If you’re having trouble
with any aspects of webinar at all, just reach out to Shannon through the text chat box and she
will be able to lend a hand at that screen. Now, we know from previous webinars
and our experience with beyondblue SenseAbility what it’s about. It’s a strength-based resilience program which
has been designed particularly to meet the needs of 12 to 18-year-olds although we see
examples of it being extended and modified, that’s the beauty of it. It can be adapted
to suit particular context. In the heart of SenseAbility really, and these
are just my words I guess, the heart of it seems to beat around cognitive behaviour therapy
with a dash of… By following my MasterChef metaphor, with a dash of positive psychology
for spice and it certainly seems to be a good pinch about neuroscience, what we place in
our conscious minds flourish. That seems to be at its heart. Now, tonight’s webinar, when we get our talent
here, is going to pick up this theme, if you like, of SensAbility and its place within
the Australian curriculum with a particular focus on one of the elements. We know that the Australian curriculum is
a three-dimensional curriculum. It’s built around three components: There’s the content,
that’s the curriculum knowledge; there’s the general capabilities and the general capabilities
are both the how and who. In one sense, it’s how we learn but it’s also
who we are as we learn. And the third part of the Australian curriculum are those, I
was gonna call them horizontal connectedness elements. So, they’ll be those other elements; indigenous
people when they’re studied, Asia and sustainability, and I’ve completely forgotten the term for
those. So, if you could pop that in the text chat
box and remind me. I’m thinking… My mind’s gone blank. So, what do we call those three
elements in the Australian curriculum, somebody in the room, please help me out there? Studies of indigenous Australians, studies
of Asia and sustainability. That’s not… You wouldn’t get a point for that, Rene. What you’ve identified is one of the general
capabilities, but you get a point for trying. Well done. If this is game show, people, you
will be very slow on your buzzers and Eddie McGuire would be getting somebody else from
the hot seat to come in and take your spot. It will come to me in a moment. So, Shannon, if you wouldn’t mind, if you’re
not doing something dramatically busy at the moment, could you just drop a link in the
text chat box, please, for the link to australiancurriculum.edu.au for people’s reference and somebody can look
up the answer to that question, cross-curriculum perspectives. I beat you all. The money is mine. I’m in
the hot seat. Cross-curriculum perspectives is the other element of the Australian curriculum.
Now, what Jessica is going to do… No worries, thank you, Shannon… What Jessica is going
to be doing in a short while is she’s going to map out SenseAbility against the Australian
curriculum. And she’s going to do this as a practitioner’s
lens. So, for the educators in the audience which we all are, this would be particularly
useful and relevant to us. What Jessica is going to do is to tease out
the general capabilities and particularly line those up. Now, this is a really interesting
area because we’re often hearing about 21st century skills and the need for learners today
to have adaptive competencies. The 21st century skills are the general capabilities
and meta studies and research, which have been undertaken globally, keep coming back
to a very similar set of capabilities, which are addressed within general capabilities. So, this is really exciting stuff because
the work that Jessica is going to do with us tonight lining up SenseAbility against particularly
the general capabilities provides, if you like, some further evidence about the importance
of this work around mental health and well-being as being fundamental for learners and learner
achievement and not ornamental. So, Jessica, How are you going and how are
you feeling at the moment? Can you hear me okay? I can hear you super well, Jessica, and welcome
to the webinar. I’ve been providing a most excellent, even
if I do say so myself, broad sweep about the general capabilities and the work that you’re
going to be sharing with us, if you like, aligning or mapping up the SenseAbility material
with the Australian curriculum’s general capabilities. Yup. So, Jessica, if you’re feeling warm and
cosy and loved over there, your video is coming through fine, I might turn off my ugly, jaded
visage from the screen and let you step up to the microphone and lead us on. Thanks,
Jessica. No worries. Okay, so I just mapped the SenseAbility
against the personal-social capability and looked at where it would fit in nicely to
the teachers to be able to use and so that no one has to re-invent the wheel basically. So it fitted in really, really nicely. I used…
I have been using SenseAbility in the classroom. I use it with my year eight math and science
class. So that’s a bit of my background. I have an all-boys class, so I wanted to see
how I could use it across the curriculum because teachers are going to have to report using
personal and social learning and it will have to be in their reports as of next year, so
I’ve used it across the curriculum and find it really, really useful. So to map it, I had to look for specific evidence
that would fit in, so I’ll just go to… So this is personal and social capabilities,
so at the moment it’s on a continuum, so it’s level five and level six. Level five is Year seven and eight and level
six is Year nine and 10. There’s the Self-Awareness, Self-Management, Social-Awareness and Social-Management,
so the Self-Awareness is students being really aware of themselves, having self knowledge,
knowing a bit of their emotional state. So they know what influences their emotional
response and they know how to control it. They know their limitations and learning from
success or failure, which there is a lot of evidence in helpful thinking of students being
able to demonstrate this. The one thing that they couldn’t really do
was understand themselves as learners. That was the one thing with the SenseAbility
curriculum that I found, was in terms of students being able to reflect on how they participate
in group work, watch how effective they are, reflecting on themselves, participating in
the group and recognising their own contributions. I think a lot of teachers assume that students
know what good group work looks like and this is a really big theme about the Self-Awareness.
I have developed some rubrics working with beyondblue and looking at what students
actually can get some good examples about what good group work looks like. So I was very, very specific in the rubrics. Self-Management is basically students
being able to manage their emotions. So, knowing what pushes them to the limits and giving
lots of examples of that. There’s a lot of evidence in SenseAbility for
this. Social-Management is students being, knowing themselves in a group situation and
being able to manage their learning and Social-Awareness was… So, Social-Awareness was contributing to a
civil society and doing things like that. This was the one that doesn’t quite fit in
well with SenseAbility, because there’s some pretty big dot points that students need to
achieve. One of them was learning, so explaining relationships
differ between different groups and identify the skills needed. That was a pretty big dot
point that is hard for students to demonstrate. So, this was the Self-Awareness, so these
were the dot points that students needed to actually achieve. So, they’re broken up into
four, that was that understanding themselves as learners. So I gave a couple of examples
of evidence in SenseAbility so then allowing students… I’m not going to read it to you, because I
can’t stand it when people read stuff to me, teachers know how to read. So the evidence
is there. They were just two examples. There were lots and lots of examples. I really,
really liked how SenseAbility gave lots of opportunities for this and I’ve used a lot
of these, just little activities in my maths class. Just to try them out and to see how they
fit in, and the discussion questions are fantastic. The discussion questions are actually scaffolded
to really reach that level six, which students to be able to reach and demonstrate their
understanding. The one part that I couldn’t get enough evidence
from was understanding themselves as learners. So working like I said before with beyondblue
to develop some rubrics, just for students to evaluate how they work in a group. And I was really specific in these and I’ve
trialled these and I’ve asked some other teachers to trial them, just on how students can look
at how they behave in a group and the affect of their behaviour, and what do good listening
skills look like, so very, very specific. So for instance, for my listening,
discussing, and questioning, my “excellent” was when I listen, I maintained eye contact,
nod my head and give positive facial expressions. I pose questions during discussions and give
feedback to all group members. I do not interrupt others when they speak. And I think as teachers, we sort of assume
that students know what good group work looks like, but they often don’t, and this… I
trialled the rubric and found it really effective for my students to actually take something
back and to work on. So I asked a lot of questions later on to
the students, “Well, next week, what are you going to improve on? What are you going to
focus on? What would you like to do better,” things like that, and Year eight boys like
talking about themselves. So I got some really interesting feedback on it. They did like that I didn’t just write that
“excellent” meant these things. It was that I spelt out the behaviours. And I’ve trialled
it in other things and that’s worked with other activities and other subjects and it’s
worked really well, so I hope it is a nice addition. The other one that I did was for students
to actually rate their performance in the whole session. So there was a lot of group
work in SenseAbility, but there’s some that doesn’t require group work. So I wanted them
to actually look at what does considering other people’s ideas look like? So what behaviours would you show in class
and how would you rate yourself based on those behaviours? So students could be really, really
specific with getting good examples. And I find that the behaviour and the group work
improved dramatically over the time. So, that to me was one that needed to be the
best and the developing reflective practice was just students being able to use what they
got from SenseAbility and as I said before the questions are scaffolded, so that kids
can then use their information. So that was Self-Awareness, and that’s one
that I really liked. ‘Self-Management’ this is being able to manage their emotions and
to learn from their successes and their failures, and there’s lots of good activities in the
‘Helpful Thinking’ and ‘Emotional’… a lot of the DVD activities, the discussion
questions, really get kids to think, like, “How would Joe feel now? What would Joe think
differently? Why did Joe think like this?” which are really quite probing questions.
They’re not just simple questions. And they allow for great discussion, especially
if you can relate it back to the students that works like a charm. Which I found a lot of activities
that then supported the initial activity, like in ‘Helpful Thinking’ or in ‘Emotional’,
it backed it up, so it gave students a chance to demonstrate their understanding. So that was… Yeah that’s Self-Management,
which I really like ’cause it has the resilience in it and gave a few students even the chance.
Group work is pretty intimidating, but even having a discussion with them afterwards about
how they went, so that was Self-Management. ‘Social-Awareness’ is being aware of their
group and looking at how their behaviours impact on a group and understanding different
relationships within a group and within a school setting. There’s lots of opportunities
for this because of the actual activity in ‘Emotion Recognition and Regulation’. There’s lots of opportunities and discussion
questions: What are you feeling? Why are you feeling this? Even questions that I really
like is: What might the person had been thinking to make them feel that way? A lot of what I base this on was the teachers,
having the evidence based on their discussion and maybe the journal entry afterwards to
use to report against. It’s really just the students. It’s not really high, medium, or
low. It’s more going to be based, or at the moment,
it’s based on the spectrum, so you can see where your students are moving from. But I
think eventually, we’ll move to actually creating it so that it’s going to be in year levels. So it’s going to be Year seven, year eight,
year nine, year 10. At the moment, it’s in level five and level six, which is very different
language. So it is the… Some examples with that. So hopeful thinking. There’s lots and lots of examples of this
one, the Social Awareness. It was quite easy for kids to achieve these apart from some
activity at the very end, but overall, I thought there was lots of evidence for this. So, there’s four components. So then we have
Social Management… Jessica. Yes? Sorry? Sorry, Jess. I’m just gonna give
you a moment just to catch your breath for a second and to give people who are listening
a chance to drop any questions in the text chat box. If you’ve joined us for the recording, welcome
to the SenseAbility webinar where we’re mapping the SenseAbility material against some of
the general capabilities with the fabulous Jess Satori and welcome to you if you’re viewing
this recording. Jess, so I’ve just jotted down some notes
here and there’s no doubt about it. They are some really powerful lessons that you’re sharing
here. It’s absolutely fascinating for me as a teacher and a principal, you’re teaching
Year eights, maths and science, and it’s all boys, I mean that’s pretty impressive already. What it sounds like you’re doing is, it
sounds like you’re using the SenseAbility material and obviously your in-depth knowledge
of the personal and social capabilities from the Australian curriculum to make valued and
the personal and social learning, you’re making it really explicit for those boys, you’re
identifying the behaviours that help, you’re naming them and I’m presuming with the boys
too, developing in them the language to be able to name those capabilities. But importantly, what you’re doing and this
is the bit where it dances around that neuroscience. You’re allowing those positive pro-social
helpful behaviours to flourish by constantly bringing them into the learners’ conscious
mind. So there’s a lot of assets with what you’re
talking about I think this recording is going to be really popular. So friends, feel free to continue
to ask questions. I know, I’ve got one. I wanted to ask at the
end Jess, about how you collect the evidence to allow you to make the judgement that I’m
sure I can ask that at the end or might be coming up. That’s your time I’ve just given you to catch
your breath, have a drink or water because I know what it’s like when you’re on the hot
seat with a little camera facing you. It’s going great. Thanks Jess, back to you.
Thanks for that, Mark. [chuckle] It was a very weird situation, but… Yeah, I really enjoyed and I hope you can
hear it in my voice. I really like the personal and social because it really focuses on life
skills and just kids being able to handle themselves and understanding themselves, and
if it affected their relationship and etcetera. So the last one is Social Management and this
is the one where there’s a few different examples where I really like this one but I have a
little bit of an issue with that and VCAA and ACARA and everyone who writes the curriculum
will probably come down on its knee, but the last dot point was developing leadership skills.
And to me, a lot of the dot points… In Self Awareness, Self Management and Social
Awareness, there are a lot of opportunities for kids develop leadership skills within
the group, but the dot point that they’ve got for leadership skills is the kids have
to communicate a project on a local-level, state-level and global-level and to me that’s
just… There are opportunities to do that. I wouldn’t
wanna limit my students, but I just could see teachers being very intimidated by that. I’m thinking, “How am I ever gonna get my students to reach that
target.” So that’s a bit of my the downside there and
that’s where I’ve actually written that it’d be really good and I recommend that in the
documentation that before you even begin, you start by developing some group protocols. This is the only one where I don’t think students
will be able to achieve, Year nine and Year ten, level six because of that dot point. And I think I would devalue the curriculum
and devalue SenseAbility if I said that if these go together, I thought fitting that
square in a circle, it just doesn’t fit and it doesn’t sit well with me and so I just
don’t think students can achieve it. There’s lots of other opportunities for them
to try and get there, but developing those leadership skills I think that it just won’t…
It doesn’t fit in with SenseAbility, but everything else, there’s opportunity for students to
achieve it, but that one looks just a bit of an iffy one to me. So I just don’t think that they can achieve
the level six, but I think they can definitely achieve the level five. There’s enough evidence
to gather that across the board. So the students… The rubrics really gives student to… The student to teacher feedback, so you’re
able to get an idea of where your classes are at and how they’re coping with
it because some of the activities can be quite confronting in SenseAbility. And if you’re not really 100% comfortable
which all teachers aren’t necessarily, I think it would be… I know that we keep saying
that in a perfect world, that everyone would be comfortable with it but it’s not a reality.
So I think we have to acknowledge that some people would not be comfortable with it. So, using these rubrics is a way for teachers
to gain an insight into where students are feeling, and what they’re getting out of it,
and maybe that they can approach someone else if they’re not comfortable with it. But at least it might highlight, that there
is a student that’s not going through something at that moment in time and if that’s just
highlighted and that student feels supported, then I don’t need to convert the converted
really. So, the students’ self assessment is… There’s the examples for personal and social, what
they expect, so the students are able to generate, apply, and evaluate strategy, such as active
listening, mediation, and negotiation to prevent results into personal problems and conflicts. So that was part of my assessment on recognising,
making them realise the behaviours that can actually contribute to those or limit them.
So, what they’re actually doing, and just developing through group work practices, and
realising the impact that they have. As I said before, I’ve used the rubric to
help me with my collection of data, where I can see my students achieving and I believe
that my group work has improved dramatically in the boys class, dramatically. They’re really,
really good. So, yeah, that’s basically me. So, yeah. No worries Jess. Thanks for that.
And you’ve put up some contact details there which is great. I do want to ask a couple
of questions in a moment, to get a bit more sense as a teacher. You know, what this practically might look
like, but I’ll get to that. One of things that we all know is that the teacher’s standards
talk about one of the organising elements; “Know your content and know how to teach it.” And I think what you’ve done is you’ve flipped
that around a bit for me. Because now I’m thinking its really about “Know your learners
and how they learn.” So, as opposed to “Know your content and how to teach it,” we need
to know our learners and how they learn. We need to understand the context of our learners;
we need to understand their developmental pulse, and then we need to be able to shape
the learning experiences which pick up on their positive assets that they bring to the
learning situation. The bit that I really liked, and I’ve just
jotted it down here in clumsy language, is that what you’re talking about with your work
around developing personal and social skills isn’t a bolt on to your maths. I’m not getting the sense that it’s necessarily
you know, I’m squeezing in this extra little micro-lesson around, you know, self regulation
or self reflection. But it’s a fundamental building block for how you design your learning. There must be a tension though, I hear this
all the time with maths and science teachers. I hear this tension point about this driving
agenda of getting through this stuff and content. And you would hear that from colleagues, you
would feel it from line managers and you would hear it from parents. And unfortunately the
reality is a lot of this stuff that sits in the non-cognitive domain, is still for many
people perceived as being, you know, not a necessary part of the valued activity. How
do you address that as change agent within, your school and your parents? How do you get
that buy-in? I think you’ve gotta share your
success and share your findings with this, and say you know, “This was really hard and
I know that I’ve got a lead on things that I need to do.” But it was successful and it
worked and I’m getting a lot out of this, and I can see the difference in my students
and… ” In fact, I think with in terms of what the group work, I’ve managed to go through
the curriculum, at times a little bit faster because they’re far more effective. If I can
get my kids to think about their emotions and the effects and look if it takes me a small activity to teach them how to do it by using SenseAbility then I don’t see that is a big, you know…
It’s not like I’m running the entire unit over, and taking a whole class, maybe I’ll
take three activities and run them over the, you know, two weeks or three weeks, and stick
them in at the beginning, and change it up a little and design it so it fits in quite
nicely, because I do a lot of co-operative learning and just setting up those protocols. And you don’t have to set them up using science
activities, you can set them up using, other activities. And I think I’ve got other teachers
on board because they can see the effects that it’s had on my classroom. And I’m very open about teachers coming in
and seeing what’s happening and you don’t have to tap dance in front of them. And I’m
very honest about, if it doesn’t work it doesn’t work. And I’m not dying to bother trying to
fit the squares in the circle hole because I’m too time poor. I don’t have the energy to put into that,
but if I can see something that works and run with it, then that’s where I can find…
I know my energy is well spent and I know that I’m putting the right, the right activities
into my time to get that bang for my buck, if that makes sense. So I think that it’s… It’s crept into the
school and I know that SenseAbility, they use it in other areas. And I’ve just been using
some of the activities to just help my group work because they are all boys. And they’re not great at explaining how they
feel and I find that this has helped doing… Helped me as a teacher understand them as
learners, which means I’m just going to get through the content. I’m going to pick out
their interests and what they want to go with and it’s… Yeah I just need… And I m doing what I’m
supposed to be doing as a teacher. Really. Yeah. I think you got… I mean,
you certainly hit the nail on the head there with the buzz around this EduTECH Conference
that I’m attending right now. And what I’m hearing around Australia and
the Asia Pacific. Everybody’s talking about the critical need for personalised learning
about personalised learning plans about being able to get to students to self regulate.
To self assess. Yes. Become project managers of their own learning.
To engage in extensive learning that’s profoundly personalised. What you’ve done is you’ve cleverly
found a resource that provides some explicitness. It provides some clarity and it provides some
of that really important real world structure that an everyday classroom teacher needs to… To make sense if you like of the general capabilities.
So the SenseAbility that you’re showing here isn’t just in the name of a resource, but
in your very approach there’s a sensible approach to taking the good resources and bending them
to your will. Yeah. To match the needs of your learners. That’s right. Right. So Jess, I’m aware of
the time everybody and we’re… We’re racing around the clock. Could I cast over to Denise
Dye? It could be Jody, Joyce, Nat, Rene herself or
even indeed the fabulous Shannon McGeary, they might like to ask you a particular question.
Just one question from me while they put their thinking hats on. How has your assessment…
Approach to assessment changed accordingly now you’re looking for particularly non-cognitive
attributes. Jess? That’s why I needed the rubric really. When
I was looking at this, it was really hard to get evidence of it and I need the evidence
to demonstrate where they’re at. And I’m not reporting against this. So this
was all trial. Like this… I just wanted to see how it would run. I couldn’t try. I
couldn’t evalu… Thank you. I couldn’t. Lost my train of thought there. I couldn’t…
I needed evidence and it was really hard at the end of the session to get kids to say,
how did you feel about it? And they weren’t using descriptive words,
and they said, “Oh yes… ” Okay, I feel like you’ve achieved these because this is what
personal-social learning is. It’s not really evidence. You couldn’t tick
a box and say yes I’ve done that like you can with maths. Like everything’s on this beautiful linear line, and you can just pick a moment and, say, yes okay you achieved these. You can do these skills blah blah blah blah
blah. So that’s why I needed the rubrics for students. So I had that evidence and the documentation
for students could give me how they give me their feedback and they could assess themselves. And then I would really encourage them to
get one of their peers to sign it off with who been working with them in a group. And say yep some folk had been doing this
and they did this and this in the group. And then I would get round to talking to them
in the session. Our sessions run for 72 minutes. So I generally
run the SenseAbility activity somewhere in the beginning and then go on with my normal
lesson. And then come back to making a point of going
round and just having a chat with the students and making sure that everyone is okay with
what has happened and just to maybe gauge where they’re at and I could write notes on
the back of their evaluation sheets and whatever. At the beginning, I was photocopying
lots of sheets and then actually wanted to get the students to acknowledge how they’ve
grown. So I changed it so that they just signed off on whatever they’d achieved. So that then
I had that actual evidence on what they’ve done. So the other big components of personal
and social learning. It is difficult. It’s not easy to collect evidence ’cause you’re…
Like if it’s not cognitive what they’re exactly doing and they’re working in teams, making
decisions, its empathy. That’s my peak battle. So it’s more my teacher judgement
and making sure that I wrote notes after it. And this was just for me really. Because
like I said before, there was no reporting against this as yet. There won’t be until
2015 and that’s even if what will happens, happens with it. So yeah. Yeah. Yep. And… And more importantly
as a classroom teacher the… The tone, the culture of your classroom. How
we get along and who we are. The critical elements here. Above and beyond the… Any
kind of narrow scorecard. And Jess, it’s very clear that when we teach,
we teach who we are. And obviously when you’re teaching, you’re teaching the same kind of
passion and enthusiasm for shaping active and informed citizens. The kinds of kids who are creative and confident,
choosers and users of tools to get on with the learning. And that, as we know is, me just
pulling directly from the very heart of the Melbourne declaration of which is built around
the general capabilities and the curriculum. So we are shaping active and informed citizens
who can make moral and ethical judgements to make a life and be happy if you like. So
that’s com ing through loud and clear. We’re getting some commentary. Just cast your eyes
to the text chat box, Jess. Somebody’s just asked about one of the rubrics
that you’ve referred to is that, an asset, that’s available for people? Yes. That will be available definitely
on the beyondblue website. I put it on a slide, but it looked ridiculously
tiny and itty bitty and people will be squinting at their computer screens and thinking I can’t
understand that. So definitely it will be up there very soon. Great. That will be terrific. For me, as a
teacher listening to you, one of the things that I would love would be to see a little
vignette of you in action as part of the YouTube channel on the beyondblue site. Because again as a teacher, I can listen to
it and I can look assets and resources, but when I see a real teacher engaging with particularly
a challenging context, it’s easy for you to show me a bunch of an all-girls school in
an affluent area all sitting there quietly and working together. But show me an all-boy in maths and science
class where at its heart is SenseAbility, where at its heart, are personal and social
capabilities being masterminded by a person who knows their learners and how they learn,
then you’ve certainly get my attention even more than you have done. So in this afternoon’s webinar, I am very
impressed with your knowledge of the personal and social capability and how you make use
of that in your class. I can see why you are held in such a high esteem by your education
system. Okay let’s just cast back over, we’re about
to wrap up. What I want to do is just to give Rene a bit of an opportunity to put anything
else that she needs to into the text chat box and I’d like to thank Rene for attending
the session, her helping coordinator Shannon McGeary of course for her excellent job in
helping this all run smoothly as possible. And our special guest speaker, Jessica Satori,
I got your name wrong before and I apologise, but we’d like to send out a huge shout out
to you via the text chat box to say fantastic. We love your work, we love what you do, but
more importantly you’re helping us as an education community to scale up best practice by sharing
what you know and can do through a forum like this one and we’re appreciative of that. So I’m just going to cast now for any final
words from Jessica. My question to her is just simply what is your call to action? I’m
Mark Sparvell from Principals Australia Institute. Thank you and goodnight. Jessica, our call to action. I think that… Oh gee, Mark, that’s a big
question. I would want to see teachers using person, social and SenseAbility together
across all their classes and that’s me living in an ideal world. But I think when you look at the kids of today,
not to put them all in a box and not to generalise, but they need it more than ever, resilience,
everything. And that’s the part of which that I really
love and challenging kids. And I think that the parts that test the social that I just
love, that I think, it is so relevant for what kids need and I think SenseAbility provides
a fantastic way to see that. So I would hope that people just get on board
and realise how it can be used in the class, teachers just to love to re-invent wheels
and this does not need to be re-invented because it’s there, it’s done and you would benefit
your students just by using this so much. So yeah that would be… Great. Thanks Jessica. If we are playing a
hot seat, you would have probably won $100,000 then but we’re not and you’re not. Feel free to exit this webinar by clicking
the cross at the top right hand corner, a very brief survey, only a couple of questions
will pop up, it will help us to shape our next webinars to make sure they meet the taxing
needs of our education audience. Thank you again Jessica, goodnight to you. Thank you Rene, Shannon, thank you participants
and thank you if you’re viewing this recording there in hot demand at the beyondblue website
and also through Principals Australia Institute. Goodnight! Thank you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *