The Stress Inventory

The Stress Inventory


Hi my name is Gary Berge and I’ve just completed the two-year Foundations 2 Program at the University of Trenton Ontario and the Mehrit Center on self-regulation. I’m part of the first group of graduates from this program and I’m presenting a series of information videos on the Shanker Five Steps of Self-Regulation and understanding the five domains of stress and I’m posting these on YouTube. Each video is about five minutes in length and contains five slides of information. Each video has a brief written description and is designed to be very practical and concise. The series is designed to be followed in video sequence to fully appreciate the self-reg process. Each video will require the viewer to create their own stress inventory and continue to add to it throughout the series. All materials for the series comes from the Mehrit Centre and the Foundation’s 2 course participants. Please contact the Mehrit Centre at https://self-reg.ca for further information on these topics or you can contact me at www.wildrosecaregivers.com Thank you, and I hope you enjoy the series. The Stress Inventory by Gary Berge Before viewing this video please make sure you have watched the video on The Science of Stress. Please take your time viewing each of the five domains of stress and with a pencil and paper, write down any of the relevant stressors that you’ve been feeling lately. Just pause the video to give you time to complete the inventory. Please add any additional stresses that may not be included in the inventory. For each of the following domains the biological domain, refer to any stress that affects your body whether it is external or internal. Please read through the list and write down any of the stresses that have been affecting you recently, or are a cost of long-term stressor. For example: chronic long-term back pain as stated in the slide. There is not a comprehensive list of examples but it would be a good start to help you identify most or all of your biological stressors. Just pause the video to allow you time to write down your examples on your stress inventory. Emotional stresses are related to your feelings both positively and negatively. For example you could enjoy all the emotions associated within a relationship such as love and feeling valued, but at times you can experience feelings of disappointment, disengagement, anger and frustration. Please pause the video and write down examples of the emotional stresses that are affecting you on your stress inventory. Cognitive stressors are related to mental tasks that you need to perform every day. Since these stresses often occur in our work environment, they can be both positive and negative. Depending on your level of tension and energy. This will be a talk I’ll discuss it in the videos on the Shanker Five Steps of Self-Regulation. Please pause the video and write down examples of stresses that are affecting you from the cognitive domain. The social domain refers to stresses that can come from any form of social engagement including family, work and socially. Just pause the video to allow you time to write down your examples on your stress inventory. The pro-social domain includes empathy, caring for the well-being of others and collective engagements. Just pause the video to allow you time to write down your examples on your stress inventory. Hidden stressors are stresses that are not obvious. We’ve forgotten about the original stressful event, but there are memories associated with the event stored in a hippocampus. Through association, these are stressors that come from any domain and burn tremendous amounts of energy. Once in a Limbic state, the amount of energy burned can be extreme and the brain adapts to protect itself from the stress by placing the amygdala on high alert, while shutting down the prefrontal cortex and this has a significant impact on a person’s ability to control their emotions. Stay calm, pay attention, and form healthy relationships. Triggers to our hidden stressors are often associated with our senses such as smell, sound sight. When we’re exposed to one of these triggers can cause a limbic reaction. For example, the smell of Cologne can possibly trigger a stress reaction. These hidden stressors are sometimes linked to traumatic events. For example sexual abuse, neglect or physical abuse that occurred in our past and we have purposely pushed out of our conscious mind in order to function normally. This group of stressors usually takes a long time to figure out. For instance, you may react strongly to particular smell of Cologne and not know why until you trace that particular smell back to a traumatic event. For example if you have experienced physical abuse and once you are aware of the traumatic event you begin to heal yourself depending on the level of trauma. Learning to self-regulate will help. Once you’ve finished your stress inventory please go to the next video called “Step 1 Recognizing our Stressors”.

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